I tested positive for COVID-19

You may be isolated, but you’re not alone

We’ve curated the best resources on the web to help you navigate a life with and after COVID-19.

Though most patients will recover fully from COVID-19, some will develop acute complications or chronic conditions. Dive in below or learn more about what Carbon Health’s COVID Positive Care program can offer you.

Standard COVID Experiences

Overview

There are a myriad of symptoms related to COVID-19 that could be directly caused by the virus or are the body's response to the virus.

What might people be experiencing?

  • Sore, achy muscles
  • Fever
  • Headache
  • Loss of smell / taste
  • Fatigue / Exhaustion
  • Nausea
  • Backache
  • Dizziness
  • Depression / Anxiety
  • Disorientation
  • Running Nose
  • Diarrhea
  • Cough

When should I be concerned?

If any of your symptoms associated with COVID-19 worsen or you develop new or additional symptoms associated with a COVID-19 infection, please contact a provider for next steps.

How long will it last?

Recovery time tends to be around two weeks for mild infections and 3-6 weeks for more severe infections. However, the length of infection can vary depending on a particular patient's age, underlying medical conditions, and illness severity. For more guidance on your specific recovery path, contact a provider

Sound like you or someone you know?Enroll in COVID Positive Care

Acute Complications

Overview

A disease complication is the unfavorable result of an underlying medical condition and may result in the development of new diseases or medical conditions. It is not currently known why COVID-19 complications develop. The complications could be due to direct damage from the virus itself or indirectly from the body's inflammatory response. These conditions can also be caused by other risk factors not related to COVID-19. It is not clear why some COVID positive people develop complications while others have an uneventful recovery. When a complication happens rather suddenly or close in proximity to a COVID-19 infection, it is known as an acute complication.

What might people be experiencing?

  • Blood clot
  • Bacterial pheumonia
  • Strokes
  • Arrhythmias
  • Reactive airway disease

Chronic Complications

Overview

A disease complication is the unfavorable result of an underlying medical condition and may result in the development of new diseases or medical conditions. It is not currently known why COVID-19 complications develop. The complications could be due to direct damage from the virus itself or indirectly from the body's inflammatory response. These conditions can also be caused by other risk factors not related to COVID-19. It is not clear why some COVID positive patients develop complications while others have an uneventful recovery. When a complication develops slowly or lasts weeks to months or even years after disease onset, it is known as a chronic complication.

What might people be experiencing?

  • Heart failure
  • Fibrotic lungs
  • Cognitive/neurologic issues/abnormalities
  • Chronic fatigue state
  • Long COVID

Learn More

YOUR COVID-19 QUESTIONS, ANSWERED

Frequently Asked Questions

  • If you are experiencing any of these COVID-19 symptoms, we recommend seeking immediate medical attention:

    • Difficulty breathing. If you have difficulty breathing after routine activities like walking a short distance or you can't recover quickly after climbing up a flight of stairs, seek a medical evaluation.

    • Chest pain. People with COVID-19 can experience substernal chest pain or aching under their breastbone. Any chest pain should be evaluated so a provider can determine the specific source of pain or discomfort.

    • Changes in mental status. Marked confusion, disorientation, dizziness, extreme sleepiness and inability to waken are emergency symptoms that can occur with reduced oxygen circulations in the body. If you are experiencing these symptoms, you should seek further medical care.

    • Blue face or lips. Face or lips turning blue are a sign of hypoxia or a lack of adequate oxygen.

    • Elevated fever. If your fever lasts for more than 3 days, your temperature rises above 103°F, or you experience chest pain or difficulty breathing with your fever, contact a doctor for further evaluation.
    • Stay home. Most people with COVID-19 have mild illness and can recover at home without medical care. Do not leave your home, except to get medical care, and try to stay isolated from others in your home. Do not visit public areas.

    • Take care of yourself. Get rest, stay hydrated, and monitor your symptoms. Take over-the-counter medicines, such as acetaminophen, to help you feel better.

    • Stay in touch with your doctor. Call before you get medical care. Be sure to get care if you have trouble breathing, or have any other emergency warning signs.

    • Avoid public transportation, ride-sharing, or taxis.

    • Let the people you have been in contact with know that you have tested positive.

  • A negative antigen test result is not as definite as a positive. There is a higher chance of false negatives with antigen tests. If you have a negative result on an antigen test, your doctor may order a PCR test to confirm the result.

    Results may also be affected by the timing of the test. For example, if you are tested on the day you were infected, your test result is almost guaranteed to come back negative, because there are not yet enough viral particles in your nose or saliva to detect. The chance of getting a false negative test result decreases if you are tested a few days after you were infected, or a few days after you develop symptoms.
  • Isolation is what you do if you have COVID-19 symptoms, or have tested positive. Isolation means you stay home and away from others (including household members) for the recommended period of time to avoid spreading illness.

    Quarantine is what you do if you have been exposed to COVID-19. Quarantine means you stay home and away from others for the recommended period of time in case you are infected and are contagious. Quarantine becomes isolation if you later test positive for COVID-19 or develop symptoms.
    1. If you have confirmed or suspected COVID-19 and have symptoms, you can stop your home isolation when:

      • You’ve been fever-free for at least 24 hours without the use of fever-reducing medication AND

      • Your symptoms have gotten better, AND

      • At least 10 days have gone by since your symptoms first appeared.


    2. If you tested positive for COVID-19, but have not had any symptoms, you can stop your home isolation when:

      • At least 10 days have gone by since the date of your first positive COVID-19 test, AND

      • You have not gotten sick with COVID-19

  • Before you go to the doctor, call and tell your health care provider you have COVID-19, or are being evaluated for COVID-19. Put on a face covering before you enter the building. These steps will help keep people in the office or waiting room from getting sick.
  • Currently, there is no evidence to suggest that taking any specific medications, like blood pressure medication or ibuprofen, leads to more severe illness from COVID-19. Continue to take medications and to follow the treatment plan as prescribed by your healthcare provider. Any changes to your medications should only be made after talking with your healthcare provider.
  • An antibody test may not show if you have a current COVID-19 infection because it can take 1–3 weeks after infection for your body to make antibodies. To see if you are currently infected, you need a viral test.
  • A positive antibody test does not mean you are immune from COVID-19 as it is not known whether having antibodies will protect you from getting infected again. It also does not indicate whether you can infect other people.
  • You can be around others after:

    • You’ve been fever-free for at least 24 hours without the use of fever-reducing medication AND

    • Your symptoms have gotten better, AND

    • At least 10 days have gone by since your symptoms first appeared.

    Most people do not require recurring testing however if your healthcare provider recommends testing, they will let you know when you can resume being around others based on your test results.
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